Just FYI…This Blog is Retired!

I’ve noticed that I have a few new followers on this blog! Thank you!

But I just wanted to let you know, this blog is for all intensive purposes, retired. I don’t imagine I will be posting anything new here.

I’ve started posting on a new blog, theculturalcourier.com. So if you are interested in my writing or the topics of travel, culture, anthropology and international issues, please go and follow my other blog instead!

Once again, thank you for your interest in (any of) my blogs.

Best,

Madeline

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Thank You, Tokyo

On our only full day in Tokyo we spent a lot of time being lost. The train system in the city is a combination of an underground subway as well as several above ground train lines, all owned by different companies charging different fares and using different tickets etc. etc. Calum was especially exasperated by this system.

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Tokyo Railway Map — Photo credit goes to Calum

Our first stop was the Seiko museum of clocks, as Calum is a huge fan of Seiko watches. The museum is free and you can conduct a self-guided tour via an Ipad loaded with videos and extra information on each of the displays (in English, as well as several other lanugages).

Between the Seiko museum and a visit to Meiji shrine was a couple of wandering aimlessly in search of lunch. We ended up settling for a Western-style café, not our first choice, but yummy and filling! By the time we reached Meiji we had only a few minutes to run (almost literally) through the center of the temple and take a few pictures. Again, not our usual sight-seeing style, but it is what it is.

Tuesday evening (May 16th) was the highlight of our short time in Tokyo. Through AirBnb’s new service called “Experiences,” we booked a bike tour of Tokyo that lasted from 3pm to about 7pm. The host, Bradley, is an American expat who has been living in Japan for 25 years and owns a biking studio in Tokyo.

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Bike touring! One of the other employees at the bike studio took this for us.

This biking tour was not your typical touristy, sightseeing expedition. Bradley took our group through Tokyo’s backstreets and quiet residential neighborhoods—places that tourists would rarely think to visit. He also showed us a local temple and a shrine in his neighborhood…though famous shrines like Meiji are beautiful and magnificent, these smaller, lesser-known religious sites show how spirituality is really embedded in the lives of some Japanese people.

To be honest, I almost felt bad coming to these sites as a tourist, because I know that these places have deep meaning for many local people who come there to pray and reflect. However, I was impressed with the way everyone in our tour group, people from all around the world, walked these sites with a quiet, respectful attitude.

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Calum walking into the shrine that we visited on the bike tour. Photo credit goes to one of our guides!
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Prayers written on small fans at the shrine. Photo credit goes to Calum.

The tour ended with dinner at a pork dumpling restaurant, which most of the other tour participants stayed for. We had some great conversation with the other people in our group—hailing from the US, Australia, Taiwan and Korea.

One of the biggest themes of our trip was awesome people!

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Our awesome host, his fellow bike tour employees and our tour group. Great people.

Our only regret in Tokyo is not booking more time there. We were so charmed by this city.

Until next time…

P.S. Here’s a link to our bike tour experience! Thanks Bradley!

 

First Impressions: Tokyo, Japan

Two days after Calum’s graduation from UNT we boarded a plane bound for Vancouver, where we would transfer planes to Tokyo. It was a long journey—the flights themselves lasted about 15 hours in total, and even after we touched down in Japan it was a long journey from the airport, through customs and to our AirBnb apartment. We landed at Narita Airport, which is actually pretty far away from the Tokyo city center…

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Source: http://www.world-guides.com

Our first impression of Japan was on the train from Narita to Tokyo. It might sound cheesy, but on this leg of our trip we both realized the significance of the scenery in Studio Ghibli/Miyazaki’s animated films. Seeing the Japanese countryside from the train was like seeing the village in “My Neighbor Totoro” brought to life…not in the sense that we felt like magical creatures would appear, but in the sense that we realized how these animations captured some of the ordinary aspects of the countryside that are magical in themselves. The thick green vegetation, the small village houses, the rice fields…of course there is much more to Japan than that, but it was a great first impression.

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A Japanese movie poster for My Neighbor Totoro. Source: wikipedia

By the time we reached our train stop for the AirBnb I was literally falling asleep with my head on my suitcase. Many parts of traveling have gotten easier for me with experience, but pure exhaustion is hard for me to fight.

The first thing that we noticed about our “home” neighborhood in Tokyo is that it was so quiet. We hopped off the train around 7:40 pm, and though there were many people out walking or riding bikes by themselves, there were no large groups of people gathered, and it was overall very quiet on the streets. Just like Seoul, Tokyo also manages to keep some parts of the city concealed in a bubble of quiet, even while other parts of the city are a 24-hour raging party.

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A lesser-known shrine in Tokyo. Picture by Calum.

After getting our bags into the apartment we walked across the street to the supermarket and the convenience store and grabbed an assortment of random packaged foods for dinner. While Calum worked on setting up the apartment Wifi and heated up some foods in the microwave, I scarfed down a pastry, took a shower and fell asleep as soon as my head hit the floor.

I mean, the bed was literally on the floor. That’s traditional Japanese style (and pretty comfy!).

More later!

Lois and Clark Fly Again

Long time no see!
I have been taking a break from my blog to focus on my student and TA responsibilities, but I’ve missed my blog incredibly. That being said, I will have a huge reason to write again soon.

Calum and I are traveling to Japan and Korea, May 14th through June 1st!

Here is a simple map I made of where we will be visiting, starting in Tokyo and ending in Seoul:

japan_map_blank

It will be our first time visiting Japan, but as some of you may know, it will be our second time visiting Korea. Our first time visiting Korea was when we studied abroad in Seoul during the spring of 2015. You can read our joint blog from that trip here.

Traveling means so much to as a couple and as individuals. I can’t wait to get going! I plan to update the blog as much as I can while we are actually there, and of course when we get back to the states.

If it is us, you can bet there will be some hilarious travel stories to share. 😉

Credit for blank map of Japan and Korea: http://www.keywordsuggests.com/ET6L1tDhAc8MYckK3FTFQxoOraD9ReyuTcjzNXmfXJQ/

The Reasons Behind the Photos: Part 1

I’ve recently taken the SD card out of my old phone and started combing through the over 3,000 photos and videos I saved to it.

I owned this phone from January 2015 to December 2016, so these photos cover two years of life experience including three jobs, my college graduation, my time studying abroad in Korea and my trip to Russia and China.

For some of these photos there is an obvious reason why I took them—a notable event, an extraordinary moment, a scenic view. However, for others, the reasons behind the photos are known only to me.

This post is in honor of those photos, the ones that at first glance may seem unworthy of space on my SD card, but hold special meaning in the space in my mind. Part 1 of this series is dedicated to Korea.

Photo 1: Tater Tots

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The Reason:

During Calum and I’s time in Korea we tried many new and unfamiliar foods. This was not one of them. During our first month in Korea I went to an event with some foreign friends and our Korean buddies (from the KUBA organization) and we all ate fried chicken together afterwards. When the waitress brought out our food I pointed and squealed in delight–“No way, tater tots!” The whole table stared at me in confusion as I explained my excitement…I realized I was the only American present at this dinner, and therefore the only one familiar with this funky term for cylindrical fried potatoes. Some of my friends were convinced this must be Texan or a Southern thing, but I assured them it was quite common in the US. Luckily another group of students came and met us for dinner, and the American present in their group was able to back me up. 🙂

Photo 2: Healthy Bread

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Yes, another food photo. This dense bread was my favorite snack from the local bakery nearby our guesthouse in Korea. The label above it in Korean translates only to “healthy snack.” Our friends, Korean and foreign alike, poked fun at me for my obsession with this bread, which was obviously not even close to the number one choice for customers visiting this sweet shop. The owner of the bakery came to know me because of this bread, and she even gave me a free one when I came to buy a cake for Calum’s birthday. The friendly relationships we had with local store owners and vendors in our neighborhood are something I really miss about Korea.

Photo 3: Jindo Dog Puppy

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The Reason:

Maybe it is not the fact that I have this photo but the fact that I have so many just like it that makes it seem strange. This Jindo puppy and his twin brother lived down the street from our Korean guesthouse and could often be found outside of their owner’s storefront. I could not get enough of these adorable pups and I stopped to play with them multiple times a day. You could say I was a little obsessed!

Photo 4: Mariia’s Bracelet

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The Reason:

For a week in May 2015 my “Russian sister” Mariia came to visit me in Seoul. This was the first time I had seen her since she left the US nearly two years prior, but one of the ways we had been keeping in touch during that time was through packages and letters. Included in her packages from my family were individual additions to her charm bracelet. Of course I knew which charms we sent, but this was my first time seeing all of the charms together in one place. It seemed appropriately symbolic.

Photo 5: Momma duck and Babies on the Cheonggyecheon

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The Reason:

One of Calum and I’s favorite things to do in Seoul was to walk along the Cheonggyecheon stream that flows through the city. We were able to see the stream transform during three seasons of the year–Winter, Spring and Summer. During the Spring the stream was filled with cute duck families. It was another one of those little things that gave meaning to our daily life there.

 

Hope you enjoyed these photos and the reasons behind them! Part 2 coming soon.

Feeding My Addiction: My Travel Wish List

I have been fortunate to visit many places in my life so far, but as some of you may know, traveling is a bit of an addiction! I spend a lot of free time flipping through travel books and Googling places to visit…I sometimes go so far as to look up the prices of flights to places I really want to go, even if I know I can’t afford it at the time. In the spirit of dreaming big, here are a few (but not nearly all!) of the places still on my travel “wish list”..

Staying here in Mongolia:

http://www.welcometomongolia.mn/camps/gobi-discovery-ii

I have my doubts about the “authenticity” of this experience, but it still seems incredibly interesting and fun. Also, for a trip that involves staying in non-traditional lodgings, it looks really cozy! I would love to get a peek at this culture’s nomadic lifestyle through this trip.

 

Ice Hotel in Sweden:

http://www.icehotel.com/

Chances are you have seen this hotel featured on the internet before, probably in a post titled “The World’s Most Unique Hotels” or something like that. I will admit it seems a bit gimmicky, but I would like to go and try it for myself. Probably for just one night, as I can’t imagine these hotel rooms to be very comfortable!

 

Shanghai:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Tourism-g308272-Shanghai-Vacations.html http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/05/essential-shanghai-china-street-food-dishes.html

I traveled to China for the very first time in August 2016, when I visited my dear friend in Beijing and traveled briefly to Yinchuan. I now have a tourist visa that is valid for the next ten years and I would love to make use of it, starting by visiting another big city—Shanghai. I want to eat some of the delicious street food, especially the famous soup dumplings, and experience some of the famous “cosmopolitan” culture of the shopping districts!

 

 

Singapore:

http://www.yoursingapore.com/editorials/singapores-annual-cultural-events.html#festivals-events-singapore

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/singapore

What intrigues me the most about Singapore is the mix of cultures from all around Asia that find their home there. The writer in the above lonely planet post describes the different districts that exist side by side—Chinatown, Little India, Bangkok district…I cannot tell a lie, the first thing that comes to mind when reading this list of districts is ‘so many delicious foods!’ But beyond food, I would like to experience one of the many different religious and cultural festivals that are celebrated here. Also, the green spaces in the city look beautiful.  

 

Hot Springs in Japan:

http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2292.html

Visiting one of the places on this list seems to be a great way to experience a bit of traditional Japanese customs and the island country’s natural beauty at the same time. Plus, soaking in a natural hot spring just sounds incredibly peaceful and relaxing.

 

Mexico

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/mexico/travel-tips-and-articles/76638 

I have visited Cancun twice, and although it is beautiful and fun there, I would like to venture outside of the typical tourist destinations in Mexico. I would especially like to visit some of the towns that exist in Mexico’s central mountainous area, such as San Miguel, where my aunt has visited many times. Seeing how Mexico is so close to home (in comparison to other countries), it seems a shame that I haven’t seen more of it!

 

Lake Malawi National Park (Malawi Africa):

http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/289

http://wikitravel.org/en/Malawi

When I was little my dad had a fifty gallon fish tank full of brightly colored cichlids, which I loved to watch. Lake Malawi is home to hundreds of varieties of cichlids, as well as the greatest number of fish species in any one lake in the world. Because of the lake’s isolated location, the fish that live there are a great source of study for scientists who want to learn more about evolution and adaptation. In addition, the area around Lake Malawi is full of natural beauty and like everywhere, a unique culture.

 

Madrid, Spain:

http://www.timeout.com/madrid/things-to-do/20-great-things-to-do-in-madrid

Okay, I have to admit that one of the main reasons Madrid is on my list is because of food—I really want to try some tapas! Also, the streets of Madrid look like they would be perfect for endless walking and exploring, with plenty of charming cafes to stop at when you need a break. I need another excuse to keep practicing Spanish as well!

 

Quebec, Canada

http://www.flyhoneystars.com/2017/01/23/goblin-filming-location-in-quebec-the-ultimate-guide/

http://asianwiki.com/Goblin_%28Korean_Drama%29

http://www.quebecregion.com/en/

Quebec has actually been on my mental travel wish list for a long time, but it recently resurfaced in my thoughts because of the recently concluded Korean drama, “Goblin”. This drama was filmed partially in Korea and partially in Quebec, and the display of Quebec’s scenery is incredible and beautiful. The atmosphere of Quebec City seems to fit the magical theme of the drama perfectly. The travel site above advertises Quebec as a place to experience European culture without leaving North America, which sounds intriguing to me.

I hope you enjoyed reading my list. What’s on yours?

 

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Image Source: Michael Tompsett fineartamerica.com

http://fineartamerica.com/featured/world-map-urban-watercolor-michael-tompsett.html

 

 

Moscow Musings

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Statue of Peter the Great next to the river in Moscow. Photo credit goes to Me! As 2016 comes closer to an end, I’ve been doing some reflecting on all the things that happened to me this year.
  1. Graduating from university with a B.A. in Anthropology
  2. Traveling to China and Russia with my Russian best friend

These are the two biggest events in my life during the year 2016.

I’ve already posted a few things about my experience in China, but I have yet to post anything about my time in Russia. So, this post is based off of a few thoughts I wrote down about my impression of Moscow (my first stop of three cities in Russia).

The Feeling of the City

Everything in Moscow feels so organized, from the streets to the subway to the buildings. But rather than feeling overly sterile, the way Moscow is organized feels more like a well kept home, or maybe an elegant hotel. It is tidy and that makes it comfortable. It feels open to guests, but it is hard to say how many actual guests are actually there. Instead, the “Muscovites” are the daily guests and the city is always prepared for them. This is the feeling I got from Moscow: the city exists for the people. It feels like the city is reaching out to you, rather than just existing for the sake of itself.

This feeling was especially strong in the subway (metro) where the stations are ornately decorated. I think it is safe to say that Muscovites have one of the most beautiful daily commutes in the world. At Ploschat Revolutsii station, there is a bronze statue of a soldier and his dog. It is stated that if you rub the dog’s nose as you pass, it will bring you good luck. I assumed that this ritual might be more of a tourist thing, or something that people do only on very special days. However, I observed many average people giving the dog a quick pat as they passed by on their way to the subway trains and it made me smile. It is little actions like this that give Moscow a special sense of place.

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Here I am, petting the dog statue for good luck. Hopefully this will bring good things my way in the year 2017. Photo credit goes to Mariia!

Although it might be cliche, I really feel the need to describe the weather while I was in Moscow. Most of the time the temperature was between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit, dropping down into the 50s at night, and though there was some cloud cover it never lasted more than a few hours. After the suffocating heat and humidity of Beijing in August, the weather in Moscow during this time was so refreshing. It was nice just to walk around and take in everything around me, especially in the evening.

 

 

 

 

 

Places that Were So Worth It

Of course, visiting the Red Square was a must and incredibly worth the trip. (And I can say that I visited Tiananmen Square and the Red Square within days of each other!)

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Best friends flashing peace signs on the Red Square. The day couldn’t have been more perfect. Photo credit goes to a kind Russian stranger! Thank you!

While in Moscow, Mariia also took me to the Tretyakov State Gallery. Yesterday I was speaking to my Mom and my friend Sarah about museums and whether or not to visit them when traveling.I mentioned this gallery as one museum that was worth visiting for me.I will admit that I am someone who doesn’t have much patience for museums and art galleries and would rather spend time walking around the places that I visit and experiencing the culture as it exists in the moment. However, this place was a huge exception for me.

The art at the Tretyakov is incredible, and it gave me a feel for Russian history and culture that was greater than any book or lecture could have given. I feel that the museum was enlightening for me because the subjects that the artists’ chose to portray in each piece reflect the events, stories, traditions and values that are (arguably) the most important to the Russian people. Seeing Russian parents point and explain each painting to their children was a powerful cultural experience in itself. It caused me to reflect on the art that every culture and country chooses to display in their museums and why (there are definitely positive and negative discussions to be had about this, that could be another huge blog post all by itself). Although each person may interpret a piece a bit differently, every person in the gallery is having a shared cultural experience. And of course, the art itself is incredibly detailed and masterful.

I don’t have any pictures of the gallery to share because photography inside the museum is discouraged, but you can visit the Tretyakov gallery webpage here (it is in English):

http://www.tretyakovgallery.ru/en/

In Conclusion…

That is all I have for this post! I will try to update this blog a few more times before this Winter Break is over. I’m very grateful for the experiences that I got to have both abroad and at home in 2016. I wish everyone reading this a Happy New Year!

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The Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow. Photo credit goes to Me.

Beijing — 19 Floors

I’ve been busy with graduate school and I have found it to be very tedious trying to remember and recount everything that I did on every specific day of my big trip, so I’m going to try a new strategy. Instead of creating day-by-day posts that form a timeline of my trip, I am going to write up the best stories from the trip and post them, in no particular order, interspersed with pictures of Mariia and I having fun and visiting all the tourist sites. Let me know what you guys think of this technique!

So here is the first of several stories from my time in Beijing with Mariia…

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At the Temple of Heaven in Beijing. Photo credit: Mariia

Mariia’s friend Ana lives in a high-rise apartment complex with about 25 floors and hundreds of units. The main entrance to the apartment can be opened with an electronic keycard, and the elevator can only be operated with the same keycard. If you are a visitor, you can use an electronic keypad at the front door to call whomever you are visiting and they can unlock the door for you remotely.

From the day I arrived, we had been following random residents into the front door of the apartment and onto the elevator, then using the “traditional” (not sure how to say it was just a normal key, not electronic) key Ana gave us to unlock the door to the apartment (when Ana wasn’t there herself to let us in). One night we arrived at the apartment complex around 2am, after a prolonged and scary interaction with a taxi driver. As one might guess, no one else was arriving home at 2am in the middle of the week.

So, we started debating what we should do. And eventually we decided to start calling random apartments. We used the rows of numbered mailboxes in front of us to randomly pick our first victim.

No answer.

I remember suggesting that the next number we call should include “lucky number seven”…I’m pretty sure we called 407. Funny, considering that 7 is not a lucky number in China in the same way as it is in the US, and 4 is actually an unlucky number in China (and Korea as well). Foreigner’s luck?

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Me at the Lama temple in Beijing. Photo credit: Mariia

After a couple of rings, a sleepy sounding Chinese woman answered our call. Mariia told her in Chinese that we were very sorry, but we forgot our key to the front door and to please let us in. The woman opened the door remotely for us and then hung up without saying a word.

We tried the elevator a couple of times, just to see if our luck would carry. The doors would open, but the numbered buttons to the upper floors were useless without an electronic key.

So, we climbed 19 floors worth of stairs at 2 in the morning. We had to keep encouraging each other to keep going…

“Halfway there!” “Almost there!” “Is that the elevator??”

A couple of times we thought we heard the elevator and tried to catch it, but it was always a false alarm.

The next day Mariia went out early to run some errands while I slept in. I woke up to the sound of voices speaking Chinese outside of the door, Maria and a woman. Of course, I couldn’t understand a word that they were saying.

As it turns out, this woman was the lucky winner of our door buzzer lottery!

She was very upset about being woken up at 2 in the morning. Though Mariia’s Chinese language skills are essentially flawless, she somehow knew that the two foreigners the culprits. She followed Mariia all the way to Ana’s apartment to make it clear that this behavior was not acceptable, and she wanted to speak to Ana, who was not home. Mariia assured her that it would never happen again and that we were leaving Beijing soon anyways. In the end the woman finished scolded Mariia and returned to her unit.

But not without informing us that there is back door to the apartment complex that is propped wide open, 24 hours a day.

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Mariia at the temple of heaven in Beijing. Photo credit: Myself

I love you, my friend. 🙂

P.S. To the woman at the apartment complex, I’m so sorry!

Big City Beijing (Day One)

The first stop on my big trip (not counting a layover in San Francisco) was Beijing.

I arrived at Beijing Capital International Airport at 4:30am. Yep, that’s not a mistake. 4:30AM. Just in time to see the sun rise from the tarmac.

Also, before I left, Calum told me half-jokingly that I was forbidden to ride on escalators during my time in China (due to a series of accidents on escalators there last year). We joked that if the first thing I had to do when I stepped off the plane was take an escalator, I would just turn around and ask to go back.

Sure enough, the first thing that I saw when I stepped off the airplane was an escalator. BUT I GOT ON!

Anyways, Mariia was waiting for me on the other side of customs/immigration. The feeling of seeing a friend again after a long time is amazing…but I’ve found that after ten minutes it is like we never were apart, which is even more amazing. What I mean is that we start talking and sharing updates on our lives as if we are just catching up after a busy week, rather than a very busy year.

We took a 45 minute taxi ride from the airport to Mariia’s friend’s apartment where we would be staying. The first two things I noticed about Beijing were the humidity and the pollution. The morning I arrived the sky was gray and there was visible brown haze on the horizon…I’m told this is normal for Beijing, and this day was nowhere near some of the worst they’ve seen.

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30 degrees Celsius = 86 degrees Fahrenheit ( Chart credit: crccasia.com)

 

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Don’t worry, it was nothing like the picture on the right. (Photo credit: cbsnews.com)

 

When we arrived at the apartment, Mariia’s friend Ana (This is her English/Russian name, she is Chinese) welcomed us and made us noodles for breakfast before we left to start our day.

First stop: Starbucks, of course.

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Seasonal frappuccinos offered at Chinese Starbucks during my stay (Photo credit: me)

The rest of the day was dedicated to relaxation and a little bit of exploring. Mariia showed me around her school, Beijing Foreign Studies University, and I took a picture at the university entrance. We stopped by one of the small grocery stores on the edge of campus and the employees remembered Mariia from her frequent visits. We then headed to Mariia’s favorite nail shop near the campus and got mani-pedis, as we discussed before I came. 🙂

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Me, in front of Mariia’s university (Photo credit: Mariia)

The next highlight of the day was getting a traditional Chinese massage. I honestly think this massage is what enabled me to keep pushing through the next few days despite some Jet Lag and muscle stiffness from the long plane ride. This type of massage involves every part of your body, even your hands and fingers.

By the time we got back to Ana’s apartment that day though, I was completely exhausted and I fell asleep as soon as my head hit the pillow.

More highlights from China coming soon!

Today is the Day

In just a few minutes I will leave for the airport and being my long journey to China and Russia! For the past few hours I’ve had that nervous, adrenaline-rush feeling that I usually get before flying or taking a big trip. I’m also feeling a little emotional because I know I am going to miss my family, friends and Calum so much…I wish I could pack them up and take them with me!

BUT

I’M SO EXCITED

I CAN’T BELIEVE I’M ACTUALLY ABOUT TO LEAVE!

I successfully attained my visas and packed all my things…now all that is left is to go!

I will try to update my blog with pictures and written posts as much as I can. However, circumstances may not always permit me to update, or I may only be able to write a post and without adding any pictures.

Thank you to everyone who has supported me and this trip in many different ways.

Mariia, I’m coming to see you!